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Sculptures

THE INTRICATE ISSUE OF BRONZE REPRODUCTIONS

Cet article se compose de 6 pages.
1 2 3 4 5 6
During the 1830s, a new way of reproducing bronze works called the Acolas process was invented in France. It notably enabled founders to produce works in various quantities and dimensions. Such industrial production led to a significant increase in sales of bronze pieces and enhanced the glory of several artists.

Some sculptors of the 19th Century established themselves as founders, notably Barye, but most went bankrupt after 1850 and left their works into the care of well-established firms, like Barbedienne or Susse Frères. The question raised by Arseneau is simply confining itself to semantics meaning that works conceived during the lifetime of an artist should be considered as much more valuable than those produced after his death.


Auguste Rodin
"L'homme qui marche"
1900 - 1907, bronze, 213,5 x 71,7 x 156,5 cm

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