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Forgeries

A  HISTORY OF COPIES AND FORGERIES
Cet article se compose de 20 pages.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

FORGERIES IN MANY FIELDS

Many forgers were also active in the field of ceramics as soon as during the 18th Century. From 1732 the manufacture of Samadet in southwest France produced copies of ceramic pieces from Moustiers, Marseille, Strasbourg or Sainceny.

The manufacture of Sainceny employed ceramists from Rouen who produced pieces similar to those executed in the manufactures in that city. Copies of Chinese Kien Long porcelain pieces were also produced in Sainceny.

The manufacture of Nyon specialised in producing porcelain copies of the Sax, Berlin, Furstenberg, Ludwigsburg, Lunéville, Niederwiller or Sèvres manufactures.

A 20th Century decorator named Henri Jung produced many faked 18th Century Sèvres pieces while the Samson studio sold thousands of good ceramic and porcelain copies throughout the 19th Century.

During the French revolution some 300 forgers of bank notes were executed while Napoleon's government did not hesitate to print faked notes from the Bank of England and the Bank of Russia to affect the economies of these countries. In addition, scores of forgers produced French gold coins before and after the French Revolution.

COPYING JACQUES-LOUIS DAVID

During the early 19th Century Jacques-Louis David employed many assistants, the works of whom he used to sign.

David himself extensively copied classical painters. While producing his first masterpiece, he borrowed many elements from a work painted by Jean-François de Troy and his «Leonidas» was inspired by an ancient cameo and by some sculptures produced by Giambologna.

His «Serment du jeu du Paume» (oath at the Jeu de Paume) also included elements from a painting by Carracci titled «Saint Francis and Two Saints» and from a work by Raphael, «The Parnassus».

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